About Arabella McIntyre-Brown

I'm a writer from West Sussex is southern England, but after 30 years of urban life in London and Liverpool, I now live in a remote village 1,000 metres up in the Carpathian Mountains of Transylvania. My new book is published in November 2016: "Din Liverpool in Carpati: cum mi-am gasit fericirea în inima Transilvaniei"

Undogged

 

Papi, or Not-My-Dog, has vanished. Along with Codita, his canine friend up the hill, Papi has not been seen all week.

The last time he went missing, he’d been down in the valley chasing sheep with his girlfriend. A neighbour said the farmer who owned the sheep tried to spear Papi with a hayfork, but missed him by a whisker. The farmer complained to my neighbours, Papi’s owners, and threatened to charge them for any sheep killed.

Stupid damned dog! He has a fabulous life, free to roam, fed by three households, friend to all, and left to snooze in the grass for much of the day. He is only required to chase off foxes and birds of prey, and warn of strangers coming close.

The sheep-chasing incident got him chained up for two weeks, and only by a lot of begging did I persuade my kind neighbour to liberate him. But if the fool dog has gone sheep-chasing again, it’s very possible that this time he and Codita didn’t escape the wrath of the farmer. We may never know.

So my visitors’ companion on long walks, my loyal friend who chased off unwanted dogs and cats (and bears and wild boar who came too close), and the familiar black-and-tan figure who came to greet me when I drove down to the house – Papi may be no more than fond memories. Of course he may just be off on a spring jaunt, and might be back, exhausted, starving and happy…

Papi leads the way home

Papi loved taking visitors on walks around Magura

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Just discovered a wonderful review

Copywriter and lifestyle editor,  Georgiana Ciofoaia reviewed the book on her blog back in March 2017, but I’ve only just come across it. Scroll down for an English version, or read the whole review on Georgiana’s blog.

“Cu un subtitlu copleșitor – „Cum mi-am găsit fericirea în inima Transilvaniei”, cartea Arabellei pare o mostră de laborator a României. Scrisă cu acuratețe și migală, povestea este una actuală, modernă, sinceră, vie.

Descrierile jurnalistice dezvăluie o Românie în oglindă cu toate frumusețile și imperfecțiunile ei, cu generozitatea și drumurile imposibile, cu livezile bogate și oamenii ei. Fiecare pagină are o poveste de spus. Iar Arabella reușește (cum oare?) să spună poveste fiecăruia, croind-o pe-a ei.

Scrisul Arabellei cucerește. Desenarea unui echilibru plăpând ține loc de intrigă însă fiecare capitol are sursa sa de comic, tragic sau extraordinar.

Ce îmi place cel mai mult este puterea imaginilor pe care Arabella McIntyre – Brown reușește să le deseneze în imaginația mea

Enciclopedie a vieții la țară, ‘Din Liverpool În Carpați’ este o colecție de povești reale despre case și construcții, despre vecini amabili și generoși, despre profitori lacomi, despre natură și etapele ei, despre muncă, despre sărbători.”

“With a stunning subtitle – ‘How I found my happiness in the heart of Transylvania‘, Arabella’s book is a laboratory sample of Romania. Written accurately and scrupulously, the story is real, modern, sincere, alive.

Journalistic descriptions reveal Romania in the mirror with all its beauty and imperfections, generosity and impossible ways, rich orchards, and her people. Every page has a story to tell. And Arabella succeeds (how?) to tell a story to everybody…

Arabella’s writing conquers. The drawing of a delicate balance keeps an intriguing place, but each chapter has its source of comedy, tragedy or the extraordinary.

What I like the most is the power of the pictures that Arabella McIntyre – Brown manages to draw in my imagination.

An encyclopedia of country life, From Liverpool In The Carpathians is a collection of real stories about houses and construction, about kind and generous neighbours, greedy profiteers, nature and its seasons, work and celebrations.”

 

La multi ani, România!

Romania’s National Day – 99 years since the union. A day of pride and warm emotions, some regrets and many wishes for a brighter future.

Lots of posts on Facebook today have been wishing that Romanians abroad would come home and help drive their country forward; other posts by the diaspora around the world are about remembering the good with great fondness and regretting the frustrations of a country with such potential and so many rare assets, thwarted from development by its own government…

One of the most common comments I get from readers of this book is that my enthusiasm for the country reminds readers of what they love about Romania, and so many wonderful aspects that they’d forgotten.

It’s not a sentimental book, but it seems to prompt strong sentiments in those who read it. A good book to read on 1st December…

 

I’ve just brought out another book, this time for children aged 7-10. It’s a sweet Christmas story, based on truth, set in a village rather like mine, in the Carpathian Mountains. I’m donating my author’s royalties to two fabulous charities: Eli Pet Transport, and Romanian Animal Rescue, which do so much amazing work to rescue and save dogs and cats. So every copy you buy will help a homeless dog or cat– do buy lots!

Floss cover 2.jpg

Book going cheap for Black November!

Din Liverpool in Carpati-2-final-smallGrab the chance to get my book cheap, in time for Mos Craciun, with the lovely discounts at librarie.ro! The online bookshop is almost giving the book away – a lifelong present for the cost of a couple of coffees. How could you resist?

Readers have said:

“…extrem de sensibilă în fața miracolului naturii, împovărată de un trecut cu lumini și umbre, frământată de griji cotidiene, o femeie despre care cred însă că nu e conștientă de farmecul pe care-l posedă fiind timidă și în prea mare măsură rezervată.”

“You lend us your sharp eyes and understanding. You make us understand ourselves better, you make us better understand you. You give us importance by understanding us better than we sometimes do. Your book gives us hope in a world where we have lost heaven.

A real painter in touch with the pure essence of things and beings. I found myself immersed into a dialogue with you, dear Arabella, about solitude, the energy that comes from living close to nature, the joy of being present to the sounds of the forest.”

I simply love the way in which it is written, the fact that the words can make me actually SEE/FEEL your world, is just brilliant!”

I’ve appreciated both your humour and your self-irony or the finger pointed at various strange characters you’ve come across … I got carried away…”

“The book is unlike anything I’ve read, full of emotion, in which the author puts her heart out for you, so it’s impossible not to be moved. And the language is so normal, alive, it’s like a friend whom you haven’t seen in a long time.”

“I had a ‘white’ night last night. I couldn’t take my hands off your book. It made me laugh, it made me cry or both at the same time. Regardless of what this country has been giving you, I am sure I speak on behalf of all of your Romanian friends when saying: “Thank you for what YOU give us.”

“Honest, deeply sensitive, beautifully expressed. What a fabulous book this is.”

“…the quality of your writing is top-notch and I adore the naturalness of your use of metaphor: ‘longing for dreamless oblivion cradled in the city’s roar’, ‘I’m a molecule on the skin of the earth’ and your precise punctuation, which gives your writing such a lovely flow.”

“Really, it’s wonderful – you’ve basically opened the door to a different way of seeing and understanding Romania.”

“…fascinating, and it reads just as you talk, flows so naturally. … Your chapter on Ginny was painful to read,  powerful and compelling as the reader joins you every step of the way as you navigate the darkest of times.”

Pita the puppy gets his own book!

Do you remember the story of the abandoned puppy I rescued? Here’s the start of the story.

Now Pita (which stands for Pain In The A*se) has his story immortalised in print and the book will be published in November at the big book fair in Bucharest.

floss cover cropped

Floss the lost puppy, or Floss, catelusul pierdut is published by Booklet Fiction, illustrated by Andreea Chele, and is bilingual (English and Romanian). Pita’s story is 100% true, but I’ve turned myself into a Romanian family: the narrator is Thea, a 10-yr old girl and her 7-yr old brother Tudor. Read more here.

Ideal for Romanian students starting to learn English (aged 7+), or for English-speaking students learning Romanian, come to that. You can order direct from the publisher, on +40 (0)21 430 30 95, but if you would like to buy in volume, let me know and I’ll arrange a discount (% varies depending how many books you’d like).

Come to the launch at the end of November! I’ll put a general invitation here and on Floss and Thea’s own blog as soon as the time and day are fixed.

 

Carpathian kittens need you!

Mango (left) and Fig were rescued from a tree in my garden, three weeks ago. They were terrified, starving, feral and tiny (probably about 8 weeks old).

Now they are enchanting, tame and affectionate, healthy and very happy. They both purr like Ferraris, and love a cuddle. Mango is still a bit shy but Fig really isn’t!

Click here for a short video of them.

George meets Mango & Fig

Last night they had some time with big ginger George. You can see how small they still are, although they’re nearly twice the size they were when they arrived. They eat like hyenas!

They’ve been wormed, and I’ll take them to the vet for neutering and a full check-up before they go.

Ideally they should stay together – can you imagine them in your house? They are playful  little explorers and will give endless fun and fascination to a loving owner… will that be you?

Ronald Young: Passion, networking and moral imperative are the key ingredients to success in cross-border cooperation

A thoughtful and fascinating interview.

Podul prieteniei - Мостът на приятелството

ronald-young-700 Ronald Young (photo: Ronald Young)

An expert on public management reform, blogger and art collector, resident for the past decade in Romania and Bulgaria, Ronald unveils his personal impressions of both people; his criticism of Europeanised elites and EC funding programmes; and his hope that more cross-border effort could help both countries achieve their frustrated ambitions

Interview by Vladimir Mitev

Ronald Young was a Scottish politician and academic for 20 years before becoming one of the EC’s first consultants in its programmes of Technical Assistance – which make his various critical assessments worth listening to. His blog – Balkan and Carpathian Musings – has been posting regularly since 2009. 

View original post 5,385 more words

Writing: What if you’re not brave enough to publish a memoir using your own name? 

An interesting read. Bloggers and authors talk about ways to handle your memoirs if you feel you can’t put your own name to them.

Writing: What if you’re not brave enough to publish a memoir using your own name? | Self-Publishing Advice Center

What do you think? Have I been properly honest in writing about my part in this book? Some readers have been shocked at my openness over mental health, and so on. But why should we be scared to be honest? Mental illness (and most unplanned life events are not crimes, they’re usually not our fault, and usually they are very common experiences. We need to discuss difficult bits of life. How would you handle it?

 

International cats

Today (8th August) is apparently International Day of the Cat. So here are mine for you to enjoy. I get a buzz out of watching them play, and just having them around. Hobbs and her three kits Mouse, Buster and George are now middle-aged (7 and 6) but they are the happiest cats in Romania, and sweet-natured with it.

Do you have cats? Tell me about them!

I live in a fairytale

It’s true: I know it, and am grateful every day. My brother Charles and his family came to Magura this month for their first visit, and he was utterly bewitched by the place. He told all my neighbours that it was magical, like a fairytale. And not just the beauty of the landscape, but the survival of so many traditions: folklore, traditional dress, time-proven skills, food and the whole way of life.

Roxana & girls singingHe was fascinated by my neighbour Viorel’s skill with the scythe (I’ll post a video later), and was captivated by a happy moment when Viorel’s wife Roxana and a little chorus of children stopped on their way to a village wedding to give us a preview of the song they would sing for the bride.

I love it here. Wouldn’t you?